End of Term – 5 Ways to Sail through the Summer Holidays

The summer is finally here, and for parents with school children, there’s a long six weeks holiday looming. Many may be feeling relieved at the thought of a break from the rigorous term time routine but for others, this may bring feelings of trepidation about how to juggle childcare, work, daily activities plus how to cope with challenging behaviours that might rear up from children during this time.

Here are 5 simple but effective suggestions to help you sail through the summer:

1.     Downtime and Stillness

The end of term is typically accompanied by extremely tired and emotional children so allowing them to rest and recuperate is a crucial element to the start of any holiday period.    Slower mornings and easy days at home, reconnecting with toys, books and games that don’t involve the internet will help children to relax and clear their minds. The popular ‘Children’s Meditation on Stillness’ by Les Flitcroft is a great technique to introduce to them as it gives them a sense of happiness, calms their emotions and helps them to better manage friendships.

2.     Get Active

Fresh air and physical exercise offer so many benefits to the emotional and mental health of children. Days out will not only help them to discover new places and try new activities, but the fresh air will also help them to unwind and sleep well at night. Days by the seaside are particularly good as they are not only fun, the sea air is extremely therapeutic and enhances feelings of well being.

3.     Plan and create a new routine

Just because you don’t have the rigorous timelines of a typical school day doesn’t mean you can’t establish a “School Holiday” routine for you and the children – albeit a bit more relaxed. Planning the activities and structure of the day with input from the children will help them to feel empowered and encourage collaboration.  For some children, knowing what’s coming next helps them feel safe including retaining a bedtime routine.

4.     Boundaries and Praise

It’s all too easy to take a laid back, no rules approach during the summer holidays, however, children still need both boundaries and praise to feel safe and secure whatever the circumstances. You might want to get input from your children, age-dependent, to help set some of those boundaries (e.g. how many ice creams a week) so it’s all clear up front.  And then, of course, be prepared for those boundaries to be pushed, your buttons to be pressed and for emotions to run high when you say ‘no’ but know that your firmness now will pay off in the future.

5.     Look after yourself

Your own well being is more important than ever when you are out of your normal routine.  Your physical and mental health will have a direct impact on your children and when you are spending so much time together, it’s important that you are feeling good.

Try to build in some ‘me’ time whether it means getting up earlier than normal to do some meditation, in particular, the Twin Hearts Meditation, which is backed by scientific study and has been found to rapidly reduce stress and anxiety, or by planning in time to exercise. Running, dancing, a yoga class or some other activity you enjoy doing, will help revitalise your system, you’ll be less fatigued and have more energy to keep up with the children.

Above all else the summer holidays offer a positive and unique opportunity to reconnect with our children after a busy school year, treasure this time with them.

A Mother’s reflection on Wellbeing for Children

According to Mental Health England, one in ten young people experiences a mental health issue at any one time. Enabling them to take care of their physical and mental wellbeing is of utmost importance as it has a direct impact on their future.  

Even in the absence of any trauma experienced in childhood, navigating the natural emotional ups and downs of hormonal changes, family dynamics, working out where they fit in and now the pressures of social media can be enough to trigger one of many mental health issues.  

Reflecting back on my own childhood, which was not without emotional turbulence, there’s no doubt that children nowadays are facing more pressures than ever and statistics seem to back up my own observations. It, therefore, feels paramount that we arm our children with a full tool kit of techniques they can employ to help build resilience to whatever life throws at them.

When I first discovered Pranic Healing and the techniques I could learn, I had no idea of the value it would bring to my whole family, particularly my children.  

This has played out in two distinct ways.

  1.     Helping myself has had direct positive benefits on those around me:

How many times have your children ‘played up’ when you’ve been in a bad mood?  Children are highly sensitive to energy and it’s certainly no coincidence that when you’re not feeling so good, your child’s behaviour may start to deteriorate.  As I started to learn more and more about energy, I see this more clearly than ever.

  1.     Being able to apply the techniques I’ve learnt on my children:

My eldest son has been open and receptive to me applying Pranic Healing on him since the day I started learning, at which point he was three years old.  Even now, five years later, he will ask for healing if he’s under the weather. Helping with physical pain has been wonderful but even more powerful has been the psychotherapy techniques that I’ve seen help him through periods of change.

The benefits I’ve witnessed to young people go beyond my own family and those young people I’ve treated one-to-one. Many Pranic therapists have been running relaxation and wellbeing sessions in schools and the community across the UK and Ireland.  

The sessions aim to give children some valuable ‘me’ time, enable them to deal with challenging emotions and help them overcome commonly occurring stress and anxiety.  The testimonials from the children, parents and teachers speak volumes about the power of what these simple and easy to implement techniques can do. At the heart of it all is the ability to become aware of oneself.

Helping young people to build self-awareness and equipping them with tools to help deal with the emotions and experiences that come with growing up is vital to enable them to take control of their own physical and mental wellbeing.